Funding Breakthrough in GIST Cancer Treatment

Good news reported in a release by GIST Support UK:

CANCER CHARITY GIST SUPPORT UK CELEBRATE THE NICE APPROVAL OF REGORAFENIB FOR GIST CANCER PATIENTS

Today GIST Support UK, the key charity specifically focused on combating GIST  (gastrointestinal stromal tumour), celebrated the NICE decision to approve regorafenib, a life extending drug, as a third line treatment for GIST cancer patients in England, ensuring that they have access to the same key drug as provided to patients in Scotland and Wales.

Nic Puntis & Jayne Bressington (on behalf of GIST Support UK) said:

“We welcome the NICE decision to recommend access to regorafenib as it offers greater long-term treatment options for patients with GIST.  Importantly, GIST patients in England will now have routine access to this important treatment, joining patients currently living in Scotland and Wales.

Thank you to everyone who worked so hard to review and approve regorafenib.”

GIST (Gastro-Intestinal Stromal Tumour) is a rare form of cancer which does not respond to the more usual cancer treatments of radio- or chemotherapy. Before the introduction of specialist drugs, the only recourse was surgery. With the more recent introduction of TKI drugs (ie, Tyrosine-kinase inhibitors), options improved.

The first line of treatment, which I have been on for three years now, before and after surgery last February, is imatinib (UK trade name Glivec. However, this is not effective for all varieties of GIST, and even where it is effective, there often comes a point where it is no longer so. In such cases, the second line of treatment is a drug called sunitinib (trade name Sutent). Where this too is not effective, or loses its effectiveness, the third line of treatment is regorafenib.

Until now, only the first two, imatinib and sunitinib, were approved for NHS funding in England under NICE rules.  Regorafenib has been available only under the special arrangements of the cancer drugs fund (and even that was achieved only after intensive lobbying by GIST Support UK).

Today’s welcome news means that in future, this life-saving drug will be more securely available.

Related Posts

GIST Support UK: Cardiff Conference

GIST and Imatinib in the News

One year on from GIST surgery: (1) Diagnosis and early treatment

One year on from GIST surgery: (2) Surgery

 

“Parliament gives green light to mandatory sex and relationship education” · PinkNews

MPs have passed a government amendment to make sex and relationship education mandatory.

Education Secretary Justine Greening had drawn up plans that she would act to make SRE mandatory in all schools, after pressure on the issue from sexual health and children’s campaign groups.

The plans do not include a commitment to LGBT-inclusivity, but LGBT charity Stonewall says it will be “working with the Government to ensure [LGBT issues] are reflected in updated guidance for schools”.

Her plans were given the green light by MPs today in a vote in the Commons, with the amendment to the Children and Social Work bill passing with near-unanimous support.

Source: · PinkNews

Gender, education and work: The weaker sex | The Economist

Boys are being outclassed by girls at both school and university, and the gap is widenin

“IT’S all to do with their brains and bodies and chemicals,” says Sir Anthony Seldon, the master of Wellington College, a posh English boarding school. “There’s a mentality that it’s not cool for them to perform, that it’s not cool to be smart,” suggests Ivan Yip, principal of the Bronx Leadership Academy in New York. One school charges £25,000 ($38,000) a year and has a scuba-diving club; the other serves subsidised lunches to most of its pupils, a quarter of whom have special needs. Yet both are grappling with the same problem: teenage boys are being left behind by girls.

It is a problem that would have been unimaginable a few decades ago. Until the 1960s boys spent longer and went further in school than girls, and were more likely to graduate from university. Now, across the rich world and in a growing number of poor countries, the balance has tilted the other way.

Source: The Economist