However You Identify We Must All Be Trans Allies

I hope you don’t mind me taking the time to introduce myself. My name is Ruth Hunt. I’m the CEO of Stonewall. I’m a Catholic. I love to ride my bike. I’m a godmother to three wonderful little children. I enjoy watching Doctor Who. I’m butch and I’m a lesbian.

Nice to meet you.

Like all people, there are many different things that make me who I am. One of them is my sexual orientation, another is that I have short hair, and another is that I sometimes wear suits and ties.

Some might say, I look like a boy. Others would call me a dyke. In fact, people have been saying both of these things to me since I was 13-years-old..

Source: Huffington Post UK

Ekklesia | Rich House, Poor House and rising wealth inequality

Wealth inequality in the UK has been rising for the last 10 years and is set to continue growing over the next decade, with young people particularly hard hit, according to a new report published by the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR). New YouGov polling for the report shows that the public are deeply pessimistic about the future, and believe the government should do more to counter wealth inequality.

The report, commissioned by Channel 5 to mark the launch of the second series of Rich House, Poor House, finds that the wealthiest 10 per cent of households have five times the wealth of the bottom 50 per cent. Half of households in Britain now have just an average of just £3,200 in net property, pension and financial wealth, while the top 10 per cent hold an average of £1.32 million. The report shows that every generation since the post-war ‘baby boomers’ has accumulated less wealth than the generation before them had at the same age, with people born in the 1980s having just a third of the property wealth at age 28 of those born in the 1970s.

More: Ekklesia 

Federal Judge Blocks White House Policy Barring Transgender Troops – The New York Times

A United States district court judge has blocked a White House policy barring military service by transgender troops.

In July, President Trump announced on Twitter that “the United States Government will not accept or allow transgender individuals to serve in any capacity in the U.S. Military.” A presidential memorandum said the military could discharge transgender service members by March 2018.

But in the case brought by a transgender service member, the judge issued an injunction Monday, saying “The effect of the Court’s Order is to revert to the status quo.”

Source:  The New York Times

Adoption event to encourage LGBT parents

CCS Adoption is running a drop-in adoption event to inspire potential future LGBT adopters.

The event is. organised by the Oftsed ‘outstanding’ rated CCS Adoption. It will give potential parents the chance to find out more, meet the local LGBT adoption network, and the children who need adoptive families.

In England, 1 in 10 of all adoptions are by LGBT couples. Last year, 2 in 10 of new adopters approved by CCS were LGBT couples. Working with parents across Bristol, South Gloucestershire, and North Somerset, CCS Adoption provide support throughout the adoption process and lifelong support after.

Source: Adoption event to encourage LGBT parents

NHS exec who was sacked for attacking gay adoption loses his case · PinkNews

A former NHS exec has lost his legal case, after being sacked axed for a row over gay adoption.

Richard Page had been employed as a non-executive director for a National Health Service trust, as well as separately serving as a family court magistrate in Kent.

Page came to prominence in 2015 in his role as a magistrate, when he indicated in a court case that a gay couple should not be permitted to adopt because it was “natural and in the interests of a child to be brought up by a mother and father”.

He subsequently made multiple media appearances, insisting it was always “better for a man and a woman” to be parents, and lashing out at same-sex parents.

More: · PinkNews

Discrimination, not same-sex parents, harms children: report

Children raised in same-sex families develop as their peers in families with heterosexual parents do, a group of senior pediatricians and adolescent health experts says.

And the group has called on the medical community to debunk “damaging misrepresentations” of the evidence being used by the “no” campaign in the postal vote on same-sex marriage, saying the real public health risk comes from discrimination.

Victorian Commissioner for Gender and Sexuality Ro Allen (right), her partner Kaye Bradshaw and their daughter, Alex ...Victorian Commissioner for Gender and Sexuality Ro Allen (right), her partner Kaye Bradshaw and their daughter, Alex Bradshaw-Allen, 9, turned out in support of the same-sex marriage ”yes” vote in an Equal Love rally through Melbourne’s CBD on Sunday.  Photo: Chris Hopkins

More: The Age

Poll shows Australians have overwhelmingly voted yes

A CLEAR result is looming in the same-sex marriage postal survey, with almost 11 million forms completed and returned.

THE latest same-sex marriage poll shows the Yes campaign is comfortably ahead, with overwhelming support among those who have already voted.

A special Newspoll survey shows a massive 59 per cent of those who have returned their postal ballots are in favour of legalising gay marriage. Just 38 per cent of the millions of Australians who have voted said they were against.

The poll conducted for The Australian comes just a day after the latest estimate from the Australian Bureau of Statistics revealed that 10.8 million survey forms had been returned as of Friday, October 13.

That means around 67.5 per cent of the 16 million forms sent out have been posted back.

UK state should pay for housing, food, transport and internet, says report | Business | The Guardian

‘Universal basic services’ costing about £42bn could be funded through higher taxes, say Jonathan Portes and academics

Free housing, food, transport and access to the internet should be given to British citizens in a massive expansion of the welfare state, according to a report warning the rapid advance of technology will lead to job losses.

Former senior government official Jonathan Portes and Professor Henrietta Moore, director of University College London’s Institute for Global Prosperity make the call for a raft of new “universal basic services” using the same principles as the NHS. They estimate it would cost about £42bn, which could be funded by changes to the tax system.

The recommendations include doubling Britain’s existing social housing stock with funding to build 1.5m new homes, which would be offered for free to those in most need. A food service would provide one third of meals for 2.2m households deemed to experience food insecurity each year, while free bus passes would be made available to everyone, rather than just the over-60s.

More: The Guardian

The intersex rights movement is ready for its moment | The Washington Post

 

ON A MONDAY MORNING THIS PAST SUMMER, MARISSA ADAMS is telling me about her plans for the future. They are bubbling out of her as we drive to Johns Hopkins’s Bayview Medical Center in her red Honda Fit, its back seat a thicket of table legs and frames in preparation for her move to a new apartment next month. Adams, 25, wants to finish college — she has three semesters left, after some stops and starts — and go on to graduate school in psychology. She wants to be a therapist, or possibly a psychiatric nurse. And, of course, she wants to meet someone. “I can’t wait to be engaged one day,” she says not long after I climb into her car, complimenting the ring on my left hand. “I want it to happen so bad. I hate being single.” In her free time, she scrolls through dating apps, looking for women she’d like to get to know over coffee or Chinese food, since she’s not a big drinker.

▲ MARISSA ADAMS, 25

Towson, Md.

“I wasn’t used to talking about it, to being out about it. … And I was afraid that no one else’s story would be like mine.”

But before all that, there’s the reason we’re driving to the hospital today: Adams is looking for a doctor who will at least attempt to address the effects of the genital surgery performed with her parents’ permission when she was 18 months old — surgery that was meant to make her body more conventionally female, and that she wishes she’d never had.

More: The Washington Post

Basic income isn’t just a nice idea. It’s a birthright | Jason Hickel 

Every student learns about Magna Carta, the ancient scroll that enshrined the rights of barons against the arbitrary authority of England’s monarchs. But most have never heard of its arguably more important twin, the Charter of the Forest, issued two years later in 1217. This short but powerful document guaranteed the rights of commoners to common lands, which they could use for farming, grazing, water and wood. It gave official recognition to a right that humans nearly everywhere had long just presupposed: that no one should be debarred from the resources necessary for livelihood.

But this right – the right of habitation – came under brutal attack beginning in the 15th century, when wealthy nobles began fencing off common lands for their own profit. Over the next few centuries, the enclosure movement, as it came to be known, shifted tens of millions of acres into private hands, displacing much of the country’s population. Excluded from the basic means of survival, most were left with no choice but to sell themselves for wages for the first time.

More:The Guardian